10 Safe Foods For Doggo’s Stomach!

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Everyone knows that dogs love our food more than their own, even though theirs is more expensive than our food. However, a lot of foods contain chemicals that are harmful to a dog’s health and enzymes that a dog’s body is not equipped to break down. The commonly known food that is harmful to a dog’s health is chocolate. It contains a chemical called theobromine, as well as caffeine which cannot be broken down by a dog’s digestive system, thus making it poisonous. To see a list of other poisonous food, click here

But there are few foods that can be eaten by dogs safely. Just bear in mind to feed these foods in moderation and to remove any parts that are not the flesh of the food like skin, seed, stem, etc. 

Eggs

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Can be served scrambled, poached or full boiled, eggs are an excellent source of easily digestible riboflavin and selenium in addition to having high protein content. Just avoid any additional seasoning. 

Green Beans

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Loaded with protein, calcium, vitamin K and iron, green beans make a great treat. Can be served raw or cooked, they are low in calories and filling. Just avoid any salt or seasoning.

Pumpkin

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Excellent source of fiber, beta carotene and vitamin A. Additionally, it can help keep the GI tract, which consist of the mouth, esophagus, stomach, small intestine, large intestine and anus, moving, as well as help with digestive problems. As long as you keep it plain, both fresh and canned pumpkin can be served.

Popcorn

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Good source of minerals such as magnesium, phosphorus and zinc. But not the popcorn that you get from a cinema’s concession stand. Do it yourself and skip the salt, butter or sugar. 

Peanut Butter

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If you love it, you can share it with your dog. It contains many valuable elements, like vitamins E and B, niacin, beneficial fats, and protein. Now, you must be sure to get one that doesn’t contain added sugar or sweeteners, especially a sweetener called xylitol. Let’s just say you will need to contact an Animal Poison Control Centre if your dog ingests any. Just be sure to read the label carefully and your dog can enjoy all the health benefits of peanut butter safely. 

Blueberries

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For older dogs, the antioxidants in blueberries can help improve age-related problems as suggested by a research from 2012. They also contain fiber and phytochemicals that are beneficial to the health of your dog. 

Carrots

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Apart from containing a high fiber and Vitamin A content while having low calorie content, chewing on carrots can help to control plaque build-up on teeth. 

Yoghurt

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Contains protein, calcium and digestive cultures that help to improve your dog’s digestive system. If you plan on feeding yoghurt, be sure it includes live active cultures and is non-fat with no sweetener or flavour.

Apples

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In this case, it’s “an apple a day keeps the vet away”. Containing phytonutrients, fiber, vitamin A and vitamin C, it will keep your dog’s health in good shape. It can be fed with the skin, however the seeds, which contain trace amounts of cyanide, and the core, which is a choking hazard, need to be removed. 

Oatmeal

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It’s a great alternative to wheat if your dog is allergic. Cooked oatmeal contains soluble fiber, vitamins and minerals that aid in bowel movement, especially in senior dogs. The best kind of oatmeal is without any added sugar or flavour additives. However, if grains are not part of your dog’s diet, then avoid it all together. 

Here is a video on how to make a cake using ingredients that are safe for consumption by your dog or cat.

Check it out!

There are a couple of other foods that we couldn’t include in this list without it becoming lengthy. As always, it’s best to consult with your vet if the food is safe for canine consumption. They know better than any online blog. 

See you in the next entry. 

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